What's under your scab?


Online Test For Skin Picking Disorder

Find Out The Severity of Your Symptoms With This Free Online Diagnostic Tool

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May 03, 2013

Did you receive my email?
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May 04, 2013

Hey, Yeah I did, I replied on Friday...did you not get it?
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June 19, 2013

Hi, sorry its been so long. I've had a lot going on. Still have sore between eyes and one on my chin. I'm about ready to give up. I'll write back when I have more time. How are you doing now?
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June 01, 2013

Hi: I'm new to this blog, but read your post. It sounds like we have similar issues, unless your's has cleared up using the mixture you wrote about. How are things going? Has the mixture proved to be a success? If so, would you share the secret???
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March 21, 2016

Count me in Walt. Insect bite about 2 years ago. Started mine. Yes bleed pretty good after extracting them...need help
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April 23, 2013

I am 44, when I was 11 years old I would pull my hair out, even my pubes. I will even admit to picking my nose. Since the age of puberty I have constantly picked and squeezed my skin, for sometimes hours at a time. I have stayed up until 2 in the morning, later, under lamps with a magnified mirror. I have marked my skin forever and hate myself for it. Any imperfection I have to deal with it, eradicate.. I feel sad that I have spent so much time and wasted precious time, scrutinising and worrying about each pore on my skin. The effort and concentration is immense, I feel so vain and yet it's not through thinking I am beautiful but thinking my skin needs to be eradicated from something ....I don't really know. I have even cancelled going out, my face has looked so bad after I have picked. I am married, have children, I am outgoing and am complimented on my appearance. How do I disguise what I do? No one knows, all I want to do is be less self absorbed but its like smoking, addictive. No matter if I throw the mirrors away, I find a way. I think about skin cancer and feel that would serve me right, I don't treat my skin with respect and pick and squeeze so much I deserve to get it. I am ashamed and hope that this forum will help me and possibly others.
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May 16, 2013

My symptoms are extremely similar... fleshy long deeply rooted plugs under what appeared to start out as an acne spot that becomes a lesion...when they scab, they stick to the scab sometimes and look like fleshy spikes...sometimes there are what seem to b colonies of them i n my pores or have come out in a group...they often appear around the ledges of a lesion that seems to become like an ulcer. They seem to grow more and spread. First fleshy plug i discovered came out of a scab i picked from a little sore or zit i had at the corner of my mouth that kept cracking open about three or four years ago....it got worse...now i have a new scar weekly and getting worse. Ive tried over the counter fungal cream and even tried a dose of oral anti fungal...antibiotics...laser...all of derm treatments...the oral anti fungal helped the most but it came right back...my face is destroyed and im so depressed! PLEASE HELP!! What is this???!!! I am 38 yr female with autoimmune rhumitoid arthritis....asthma and struggle with tinea versa color...and bowel issues. I take inhalers for asthma and hydrocodone for arthritis. Maybe someone has some answers out there!
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June 01, 2013

I am new to this blog as of today. I googled my issue as everyone thinks I'm nuts, and ran right into this website. I have the white rubbery "sticks" in a sore on my chin for about 10 months. I pick them out every day because they hurt and feel like pressure and never heal over - actually, the skin that does cover them if left untouched is nasty - grayish in color. When I pick the "sticks" out, there is a relief of the pressure, a lot of bleeding, and a hole where the stick once was. I've been to two dermatologists who really didn't give me the time of day. The first one referred me to a different dermatologist who treats patients with antidepressants -- I did not go to her because I want to take another route. The second one took the top layer of skin off and biopsied it. It came back as a "wart" they told me over the phone. Grossed out but excited at a potential cure, I went back to see the dermatologist who wouldn't do anything because I had picked at the area. He told me when it heals completely to come back and he will remove the wart, if its still there. So.....I am stuck and don't know what to do. Anything show promising improvement for anyone?
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July 19, 2014

It's been a year since you've posted ... did you find any answers? I've read all through this forum and yours is as close as I've come to my problem, except that mine don't itch or hurt. although I do sometimes feel the pressure of them. I've been blown off by three dermatologists who all seem to think I'm being vain. One biopsied a spot I'd had for over a year and it, too, came back as a wart, but he was so condescending that I never went back. It's been nine years now ... I don't get them in clusters like I used to, now they come one or two at a time a occasionally I have a week or two of almost clear skin, but scarred, of course. I have had autoimmune issues in the past, but those are also better now, and I connect the two. I deal with the autoimmune problems through diet, exercise and stress reduction. My diet is better - more probiotic foods, more organic and more clean meats and healthy fats (clean pork fat, pastured butter, eggs from the chickens I now raise) - I was vegetarian for 15 years. I also find that juicing a couple of times a week helps and lately I've been playing around with acidic/alkaline foods - but like everyone else, the spots always come back and have never fully gone away. Anyway ... I figured I'd toss my story in ... it's a horrible thing to have to deal with, especially with these things on my face - I'm a teacher, so EVERYONE gets to look at them because there is hiding them.
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May 16, 2013

Also...if it is some form of ringworm...after having it for years, why wouldnt it of spread to other family members by now?
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May 24, 2013

Hello, wawa I am reaching out to you....you are very insistent on ringworm. I am going to begin trying your cure today! At 39 years old and this being the middle of my 4th year and having tried more than I have seen ANY one else list...at absolute! End of my tolerance ! I hope, wish, and pray your right. Omg! Please be right.
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May 29, 2013

Greetings all, you may have noticed after reading all the posts on this particular topic, people like Paige and I have been dealing with this rather debilitating issue for some time. For me going on 13 years and yip, it starts after 30. This we can all confirm, right? I have had hundreds of these things, thankfully arms and legs with only a couple on my face. I had one cut out on my chin and sent for testing, sadly the only result was that there was a lot of inflammation. So the cost of this information a really cool scar....sure. Ring worm, I doubt it, although very similar to beard ringworm in appearance, the question asked by one of you in an earlier posting, surely it would have spread to others. Google beard ringworm, have a look at the pics and make your own call. Then again Google-ing Syphilis Lesions will provide the same question mark over what we all battle with. They all look the same, but not one talks about the spikes, or upside down exclamation marks as Paige described them in last years post. People, in all honesty I think each of us has had some remedy or other that has worked for a short period of time, only to experience another flare up later. Even when it appears the spikes have cleared up, once the skin has grown back, the little white dots will be clearly visible, and with time, they start to show their wicked intent and start up again. I recently had one on my arm flare up which has been healed over for nearly 6 years. Not a happy moment. What I have found that seems to help, but has by no means completely stopped the problem, YET, is to keep away from plasters that contain latex. The best result I've had is with surgical wound dressings. Yip, the kind of thing they put over a wound after surgery, the small ones, 5 x 7 cm. They have a little gauze type swab in the middle and can be quite tricky to apply as they have two sets of paper to remove in a specific sequence before they can be applied. Don't get the ones with holes in for breathing. I totally agree with keeping the lesions covered and after trying all sorts of creams and ointments the best result has come from Bactroban Topical Ointment by GlaxoSmithKline. You will note that when you pull out one of the spikes, they stretch and sometimes snap off after stretching to nearly three times their length, yes? The Bactroban seems to "kill" them off making them quite hard and far easier to remove. I also use, what we in South Africa call BioScrub, to shower with, washing hair and all. This is the red soap the doctors and surgeons use. It's an antiseptic soap. After you have showered, dry off properly with a CLEAN towel, make sure the infected area is totally dry, peel the outer cover off the Wound Dressing, peel off the underside protection, this is the "sticky" side and apply the Bactroban to the dressing without touching the swab or the ointment. Stick the dressing over the lesion and then remove the top protection. Rub all the way around the edge of the dressing to make sure it is stuck down properly, there is going to be a lot of that yucky fluid and you don't want it spilling out at the wrong moment. this can be very embarrassing. Now don't touch it for at least 24hours. You can shower with the dressings on, they are 100% waterproof if stuck down properly. When you peel the dressing off you will firstly have to mop up all the liquid, and then you will notice impressive reduction in swelling and probably some skin regrowth. With an LED torch, as bright as possible, inspect the lesion, you will be amazed to see how visible the spikes are. As tempted as you will be at this point to pick, DON'T. Have your shower and repeat the application ritual, remember this after the dressing has been in place for at least 24 hours. Cover it up again and leave for a further 24 hours, again repeat without picking. On day 3, yes you guessed, you can pick. I use a stainless steel pair of nail clippers, which must be sterilised after each use, tweezers just don't work as well causing a lot of trauma to the surrounding healthy tissue, shred this and your scars will be worse. The spikes will have absorbed a fair amount of moisture from being covered, they will have "died" off and be incredibly easy to remove with the corner of the nail clippers. Did I mention that a small pair of nail clippers works best, it hurts a bit when you try using the big ones and you get a clip full of the surrounding skin. This process doesn't hurt a bit, you will find the tissue to be incredibly soft and without feeling. There will still be a lot of blood when you remove the spikes, but it should stop within about 10 seconds, have a bowl of lukewarm water with Betadine or other antiseptic at hand with some gauze swabs for dabbing away the blood, use one and toss it to keep your cleansing solution clean for the next dab with a new swab. NO facecloths, toilet paper or towels. Keep going with this process, avoiding damage to surrounding tissue, only removing the visible spikes, don't dig to find more, cover for 24 hours at a time and only pick after day 3. You will note the speed at which healing takes place. When a new one starts up, do not touch it, scratch it or pick it. Rub some Bactroban in properly, the tiny red bump will be gone in 3 days guaranteed and never to return. Using this method, I have gone from 11 of these things to 2. One on my thigh and a rather irritating one in the fold of my chin below my bottom lip. Tiny and sadly a dressing doesn't work on that area of the chin. Although I have had a few new ones start up, applying the Bactroban has taken care of them in 3 days or less. To recap: Bactroban Topical Ointment Surgical Wound Dressing (They are incredibly thin and clear with the white swab in the middle) Small Stainless Steel Nail Clippers Bright LED Torch (The smaller the better, Shine at an angle and the spikes will be clearly visible) BioScrub or equivalent CLEAN Towel (and wash again after use, don't share with anyone) Surgical Spirit to sterilize your nail clippers. Bowl of lukewarm water Antiseptic, detol, savlon betadine.. Small gauze swabs. Don't touch the lesion with your fingers, I am under the impression this helps to spread the problem and don't squeeze, this will only leave a nasty bruise and worsen the scarring. Keep covered for 24 hours at a time and don't pick for 3 day stretches. Go Back to the posts in August last year. Have a look at what Paige wrote about how it has affected more family members than just her. I think this is a genetic thing which is aggravated by certain contributing factors, i.e. Latex in the plaster. Whoever had the idea to do a survey, absolutely brilliant, can you put these on a word doc and post it somewhere. You can write a link in this forum and leave spaces so the system doesn't spit it out. We can complete it and mail back for the results to be compiled. Perhaps with all of the info, we can help the Doctors get it right in future. To all of you, drop us a line in about two weeks and let me know how it's going. You should have everything clearing up properly within 3 weeks or so. Good luck all, this has worked really well for me.
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June 06, 2013

I'm Paige and I'm back dealing with 2 spots at the moment. :( The spot I spoke about last time took a YEAR to finally go away! Yeah right, all those that say, just leave it alone and it will go away have no clue. Funny, you mention latex as I do have sensitivity to latex so any bandage I use has to be latex free or I will have a lovely band aid reminder if I don't when it is removed. I came back to the forums as it seems to help me pick less knowing that every one here has proven that it doesn't do any good, but yet it does IF you remove the spike. I don't pick unless I have a spot or search my skin for things to pick at. I only get these spots on my face and when I do I know immediately whether it is a regular "crap a zit" that will go away in a week or so or the "oh no,,,, here we go again, how long will this one last" spot. The one I have now is hurting and itching so I know there is another plug in there that has to come out and hopefully it is the final one so it can begin to heal over night. Maybe it is folliculititis, sorry too tired to spell it correctly, as the last Dr called it but if so,why just the face and I don't shave, scrub hard, use perfumed lotions or anything that can explain what causes them. I still say salt is my trigger to them and when I am stressed I want salty snacks and I indulge, knowing full well there will be a price to pay. I create my problem and get so aggravated with myself for doing so. Vicious cycle
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June 20, 2013

Hi Paige, sorry to hear you still battling. I have added two posts tonight which I hope will help. Out of curiosity though, do you live in a warm climate, have cats and or enjoy gardening, If the answer to any of these is yes google, Sporothrix schenckii. Take a look at the pics of lesions and scars, read some of the information. I am almost convinced. Take care
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September 19, 2014

My "cure" is De La Cruz sulfur ointment. As I mentioned in earlier posts, I believe these plugs are glands that supply the skin with oil. They're firmly rooted to the flesh deep beneath the upper layers of skin so that's why the spot bleeds when they are pulled out. I found that if I remove all the plugs that I see (or feel) and then treat it with sulfur ointment, the wound will quickly dry up. It's just a matter of not picking the scab for about 24-48 hours. I know how hard it is to resist but believe me it works./// For me, these glands move toward the surface when there is a break in the skin that is usually caused by a pimple. Since we are pickers, we can't resist removing them. The irony is that these plugs belong where we see them and picking them out only makes it worse by allowing us to see more of them. By making the wound larger, we have access to even more and it takes months to heal./// I've tried just about everything and only the sulfur ointment has worked for me. If I get a pimple, I treat it several times with the ointment for a day or so and it simply goes away. I used to pop them and clean it out but that's exactly how the glands get to the surface.
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May 30, 2013

i don't want to know whats beneath my scab i just pick i have scars on my face arms legs i want to stop i tried everything im a artist but i'll stop and pick i tell myself no i have to still finish my art but its hard for me to continue and ive done this for a few years i barley feel the pain anymore the thing that does the most help is when i play my video games (Assassins Creed) when i play that it the music and the atmosphere that releases my stress but at times im not able to play it as much as i could because my parents wont let me and my mom thinks i need to be in mental hospital but that would make my anxiety and stress and anger go more worse
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June 05, 2013

In 1994 a pimple on my forehead turned into a scab a little smaller than a dime. The scab would hurt and when I pulled it off there were plastic "ice cycles" attached to the scab and I found things under that looked like hard rubber hard boiled eggs. No doctor could explain it. I ended up with so many of them I had to file for disability in 2001. A short time later a strange disease tentatively called Morgellons popped out among nurses in Austin, Tx. (had worked in medical records in Austin). The CDC investigated for 3 years and came to no conclusion. I had extensive documentation of my skin disease that I offered to the CDC 3 times without hearing anything back. They began to disappear in 2004 and a couple of months ago about 30 popped up on my arms and again my doctor is clueless and trying the same treatments that never worked before.
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June 22, 2013

Someone informed me that the term Morgellons was given to people that pick at their skin and cause the problem themselves.
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June 09, 2013

Updates anyone? I've been following this thread with extreme interest and am anxious to know what some of you have found out from your cultures/biopsies and experimental treatment. My "plugs" don't adhere to the scab--probably because I never give the wound a chance to scab over. But they are there--just buried underneath regular tissue. They look clearish-whitish but aren't stretchy like some of you have described. They itch like the devil, and when I dig them out, the area often bleeds profusely and leaves a type of hole where the plug was. I've wondered if it's simply scar tissue build-up or something. I'm not totally sold on the ringworm theory, but I'm not ruling it out. Itty Bitty, SpottyFace, and others actively getting tested and treated-- have you learned anything new? Thanks so much for all the info. It's really helpful to see what works and what doesn't for everyone.
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June 22, 2013

My first came up shortly after Thanksgiving last year (between my eyes). I still have that one. I have had 8 total. I'm 54. I had mild to occasionaly moderate acne in my teens and until my first of 2 children we born when I was 34 and 36. I went from then until November of 2012 without any acne pimples, then I had to get this stuff. I showed it to my family doctor and he said I should go to a dermatologist after antibiotics and antibacterial ointment did not work. When I found this site I started using Antifungi ointment. I saw the PA when I went to the dermatologist and she said their was nothing she could do because the ones I had were in the healing stage. After another few months I called and ask if I could see the doctor there. I went to my appt. And she said that it was NOT acne but she did not know what it was. She swab 3 of them and sent them for bacterial and fungi cultures. Both came back negative but the fungal culture may have come back negative. 5 of the ones that came up after the one between my eyes , I am totally convinced that they were boils. They healed fairly quickly and the scars they left were only pinkish red spot were they were. I have never had a boil anytime anywhere in my life. So at present I still have the one between my eye. It got more of those white things in it and I couldn't stand it anymore so I pulled them out and of course it bled like I hit a main artery. I have one on my chin that i'm praying is not going to leave a big whole scar. I purchased the butterfly strips to pull it together while healing but its just a little to big for for sides to meet. Here is one more theory. Do those of you that are going through this have to use any kind of steroids? I have 2 injured disc now and I have to have quite painful injections for pain because of them. Also I have never had any problems with Narcotics but in the past I always took them temporarily, like for migraines mostly but when you are in constant pain the pain management center tries to find something that will give you some pain relief with little to no side effects. Well, Norco worked for me for nearly 3 years and then the Dr. told me I had become tolerent and needed to change to something stronger. Well, I've tried Percoset, exalgo, Fentynal, Opana ER, etc..... So I was wondering if any of us have the injections or narcotics in common.
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June 22, 2013

My first came up shortly after Thanksgiving last year (between my eyes). I still have that one. I have had 8 total. I'm 54. I had mild to occasionaly moderate acne in my teens and until my first of 2 children we born when I was 34 and 36. I went from then until November of 2012 without any acne pimples, then I had to get this stuff. I showed it to my family doctor and he said I should go to a dermatologist after antibiotics and antibacterial ointment did not work. When I found this site I started using Antifungi ointment. I saw the PA when I went to the dermatologist and she said their was nothing she could do because the ones I had were in the healing stage. After another few months I called and ask if I could see the doctor there. I went to my appt. And she said that it was NOT acne but she did not know what it was. She swab 3 of them and sent them for bacterial and fungi cultures. Both came back negative but the fungal culture may have come back negative. 5 of the ones that came up after the one between my eyes , I am totally convinced that they were boils. They healed fairly quickly and the scars they left were only pinkish red spot were they were. I have never had a boil anytime anywhere in my life. So at present I still have the one between my eye. It got more of those white things in it and I couldn't stand it anymore so I pulled them out and of course it bled like I hit a main artery. I have one on my chin that i'm praying is not going to leave a big whole scar. I purchased the butterfly strips to pull it together while healing but its just a little to big for for sides to meet. Here is one more theory. Do those of you that are going through this have to use any kind of steroids? I have 2 injured disc now and I have to have quite painful injections for pain because of them. Also I have never had any problems with Narcotics but in the past I always took them temporarily, like for migraines mostly but when you are in constant pain the pain management center tries to find something that will give you some pain relief with little to no side effects. Well, Norco worked for me for nearly 3 years and then the Dr. told me I had become tolerent and needed to change to something stronger. Well, I've tried Percoset, exalgo, Fentynal, Opana ER, etc..... So I was wondering if any of us have the injections or narcotics in common.
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August 04, 2013

I have read the majority of these posts and none of them really fit my issue 100%. I have had small lesions on my face in my beard growth for the last 8 years, generally only one at a time. They itch like crazy and are quite painful to the touch. When I have picked them they have have had clear/opaque 'spikes' that are approximately 2mm in length and have a gelatinous/rubbery quality. Underneath the initial scab with the spikes and slightly deeper is a firm rubbery ball, when I have removed the ball the lesions seem to heal over but then I get another one a centimetre or so from the last one. Thanks to wawa's comments on here regarding ringworm I tried clotrimazol (canesten) during the day when I had to go out, and at night I made my own remedy using a cheap oil free moisturiser, vinegar and dispersible aspirin. Salicylic Acid (aspirin) is used in many skin products and vinegar kills fungus. I put my remedy on when at home, in a thick layer so if i went to pick it I would get a finger full of moisturiser. It also seems to have helped break my picking habit.
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June 09, 2013

this is exactly my problem. after picking my scabs this is the main reason it gets worse and it gets really bad when i squeeze and it doesnt come out so i just keep trying and completely ignore the detrimental effects it has on my skin! but i find it really soothing to peel back the skin and find these little pimple like formations attached.
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June 18, 2013

Omg. So glad people understand. My husband looks at me like I am crazy when I tell him my face wont heal unless I get the white bits out. Sometimes they are hard, sometimes stretchy and they burn and hurt and ache. After I pick them clear fluid oozes out. I have tried not picking. I have been given bactroban and fucidin creams and antibiotics. I found they all helped but after treatment ends they somehow come back. I wonder if it's impetigo and I reinfect myself with tweezers and make up and fingernails. I am so fed up. I don't want to leave the house like this. I currently have 5 or 6 scabby areas on my face. I cover them with make up to go out but wonder if this makes them worse. I am going to go back to the dr and see if I can try antibiotics and bactroban again. I keep my nails short and try to avoid mirrors...but that doesnt help when I feel my skin itching and burning. Did anyone actually find any treatment that works? Or any 'diagnosis' I could tell my dr about?
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June 20, 2013

Hi all, Paige nice to see you back. Ratyboo, if you pull out the "plug" and it doesn't bleed really badly for a few seconds, I think you may have something different. When I pull out a "plug" it bleeds properly for ten odd seconds, stops and by the morning the hole is gone. Any others agree? I did some more research about what we all may have and got really stuck on this one, Sporotrichosis Sporotrichosis is an infection caused by Sporothrix schenckii, a fungus that occurs naturally in temperate and tropical locations. Of the two clinical syndromes of sporotrichosis, the subcutaneous and the systemic, the subcutaneous variety is the most common form. The organism is introduced into the skin through a local injury, such as a thorn prick. Subcutaneous sporotrichosis can present as a lymphatic infection or a fixed infection. The lymphatic form is more common and usually develops on exposed skin sites such as the hands or feet. Days to weeks after dermal inoculation, the infection begins as a nodule that may break down to form a small ulcer. The draining lymphatics become inflamed and swollen and a chain of secondary nodules develops along the course of the lymphatics. These may also break down and ulcerate. The nodules are mildly painful, and systemic symptoms are mild or absent. In the fixed variety syndrome, the infection remains localized to the one site. A granuloma develops that may ulcerate. Satellite nodules may form around the primary lesion. This form is most common in tropical and subtropical areas. Differential Diagnosis: Sporotrichosis can be distinguished from cutaneous anthrax in the following manner. Sporotrichosis Cutaneous anthrax *Primary ulcer or nodule is associated with nodular, tender lymphatic chain to draining regional lymph node * Patient may be a gardener or have an outdoor occupation * No vesicular stage *Ulcer with eschar is painless * Ulcer and eschar are surrounded by characteristic non-pitting edema * Lymphatic vessel is not involved Sporotrichosis A 48y man presented with these two lesions around his wrist and lumps which traced his lymphatics up the arm. The story was that he had had two burns around his wrist 8 weeks prior to presentation. The following weekend he had gone to his farm in Port Macquarie and cleared scrub. Then after two weeks these lesions at the burn sites began to develop. After a further two weeks he presented to his local doctor. The patient was commenced cephalexin. A swab was taken and sent to us and was reported as ‘no pathogens isolated’ (after the standard two days incubation). After a further week the patient represented with worsening symptoms. The patient was started on flucloxacillin. A further swab was sent to us. There were ‘no pathogens isolated’ after two days. There was no improvement. He was started on erythromycin. Meanwhile, because of the clinical history of abscess and the repeated swabs sent to our lab we decided to incubate the second sample for a further five days. After five days at 35oC a yeast like organism was isolated. When this was sub-cultured at 25oC a mould form of the organism, with clusters of ovoid, denticulate conidia produced sympodially on short conidiophores. This characteristic microscopy and thermal dimorphism confirmed the organism's identity as Sporothrix schenckii - the agent of sporotrichosis. He has been started on itraconazole. He will need to take 100-200mgs once daily for at least three months. He is already improving. It is important that in cases like this good quality specimens be sent for microbiological analysis and that they be specifically cultured for mycobacteria and fungi, or at least incubated for an extended period. Punch biopsy for histology can also be useful. Perhaps it is worth leaving one alone for a bit, and then ask the doc to follow the above instructions. Reply to this if you have any info.
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June 20, 2013

Hi guys wow I found my family here with thes damn sores. My sores were awful had over 80 lessions I have RA. Low Immune system and a disease of RA called Ankylosing Spondolitis. So now that thats out of the way I loved picking them until the ones around my elbows turned into boils. they hurt so bad one night and burned I was crying so much my husband said thats it hospital now its not normal. My biopsy came back two days later at first they figured MRSA. gave me Clindomyacin. the hospital called 2 days later and said you have a bacteria called phsuedomonas and Stenotrophomonas two different strains. I was very tired very ill they gave me cypro it was helping alot my lungs had been bothering me also which you can get the two above bacterias in your lungs. I was obsessed that bugs were biting me lliving in my skin. on top of that i had gotten scabies from my grandson then ended up with shingles wich I didnt even feel becasue i was so pre-occupied with my scabs couldnt wait for them to scab over so I could peel them again to see what came out this time, little worm looking things the spike you all are talking about roots on the scabs that leave a little hole in my sore and ,man did these things bleed like a bastard I had never even had a cut bleed the way they did. tweezers yes my favorit tool picking what look like worms coming out lots of them my sore got as big as dimes. although Im almost well now I have about 9 that i cant seem to let get well i love seeing whats inside. Its sick i know I did get Bactroban and it is very good but you know what really work for me was Lotramin antifungle cream I believe it is a fungus also I noticed that around each leasion I was growing black hairs and they literally were always leaning towards the sore to get in and would and did get in and stay till i scabed over again i was reading some web site that was saying these were actually worms and the red and blu fibers i was seeing from the sores was also from Morgallons disease. mine are all located on my arms and legs. no where else. So i started picking out the black hairs and they have heads on then I have a nifty maginfying glass so i can studie these dam sores and all that comes with it. My sister in law is also suffering so the Doctors dont know there as confused as we are. wtf. I live in Siesta Key, Florida I havent been to beach yet i was in bed literally 3 months they drained me so im hoping the salt water helps im bike riding distant to my beach so i hope it helps. My mother is dying of cancer in the hospital. I cant even go see here since they say its contaigious. My husband doesnt have it. but were are not sleeping in the same bed I dont want to take that chance as he is a heart patient. Im glad to have found this site so back to the bathroom i go. Check with magnifier and see if any of you have the black hair growing around your lesions and let me know. Thanks guys hope we all get thru it its not in your head its real. Could it be some kind of Bio Warfare? thats crossed my mind more than once. read up on morgallons guys it will hit so close to home it might even scare you, Be Strong People.
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June 20, 2013

Hi there again, just been following up on Sporothrix schenckii , for those of you who didn't bother to read my last post, trust me you will find it very interesting. That said, how many of you have cats? I found this which is worth googling. I didn't write this, there are all sorts of references etc, just look it up. Feline-transmitted Sporotrichosis: A case study from California Rachel K Rees MPH MT(ASCP)1, John E Swartzberg MD2 Dermatology Online Journal 17 (6): 2 1. School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California. rkrees@calmail.berkeley.edu 2. School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Abstract We report a case of cat-associated sporotrichosis in an adult female in California. A retrospectively diagnosed cutaneous sporotrichosis infection in the patient’s cat and the unusual site of the primary lesion in the patient contributed to delayed diagnosis and treatment. Here, we also review the English literature regarding the epidemiology of Sporothrix schenkii as a cat-associated zoonosis. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Introduction Sporothrix schenkii, a dimorphic fungus, is the etiologic agent of sporotrichosis, commonly known as rose gardener’s disease. Dimorphic fungi exist as molds in the environment. However, once the conidia are introduced into the body by inhalation or traumatic injury, the organisms convert to the yeast phase. Thus, dimorphic fungi are typically infectious when in the mold form. Sporothrix schenkii is unusual amongst the dimorphic fungi in that zoonotic transmission of both the mold and the yeast phases occurs. Zoonotic transmission has been reported from a variety of domestic and wild animals, but is most commonly associated with felines [1]. Case report Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 1. Chest wall lesion approximately 9 weeks after initial presentation. Ruler units are in inches. Figure 2. Sporotrichoid distribution of lesions. In the spring of 2008, an otherwise healthy 41-year-old woman presented to the university student health clinic with a skin ulcer on the left chest wall. The patient reported that the lesion began as a single painless, erythematous papule approximately three weeks prior, followed by the appearance of additional papules and subsequent ulceration (Figure 1). She was afebrile and reported no trauma to the site. A course of doxycycline was prescribed and a swab of the lesion was obtained for routine bacteriological culture. No pathogens were isolated. During the doxycycline course, new papules and tender subcutaneous nodules developed in a linear pattern on the lateral side of the left breast (Figure 2). Examination by a dermatologist resulted in no recommendation for further work-up and no treatment was advised. Because some of these masses were associated with the left breast, consultation with an oncology surgeon was advised. Approximately two months after the original papule was noticed, two core biopsies were obtained, one from the chest wall mass and one from a breast mass. The biopsies were preserved in formalin and submitted for pathological examination. No cultures were performed. Results of the two biopsies were similar, showing suppurative granulomatous infiltrates comprised of lymphocytes, eosinophils, neutrophils, and scattered plasma cells. No malignancy was identified. Stains for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) and fungal elements (Gomori methenamine silver (GMS)) were negative. The patient refused a course of clindamycin and requested an infectious disease consultation, which occurred the following week. Patient History The patient was raised in the San Joaquin Valley in central California and was employed as a clinical microbiologist. Medications for the patient’s asthma included a corticosteroid inhaler and a leukotriene receptor inhibitor. She reported no recent travel history. She lived in Guatemala from 1991-1993 and in Saudi Arabia from 2000-2003. During the time in Saudi Arabia, she traveled to Costa Rica, Australia, Egypt, and Europe. She also lived in Michigan during 2004-2005. She had two healthy four-year old indoor-outdoor cats that were spayed and neutered. Outside, the cats occasionally fought with local stray felines. When inside, the cats often engaged in kneading type activity, that consists of repetitive clawing, while, on the patient’s lap or in the bed with her. Blood samples were submitted for complete blood count and coccidioides serology. The CBC was normal and her coccidioides serology was negative by enzyme immunoassay, immunodiffusion, and complement fixation. A chest x-ray was normal. Figure 3 Figure 3. Microscopic morphology of the mold form of Sporothrix schenkii Ten weeks after the first papule was noticed, complete excision of a chest wall lesion and biopsy of a subcutaneous nodule of the breast were performed. The specimens were submitted for aerobic, anaerobic, AFB, mycology, and viral cultures. The AFB stains were negative and the pathology specimens showed no granulomas. No fungal elements were seen, but five days later a mold grew from both the chest wall lesion and the subcutaneous nodule specimens. The mold grew at 30°C on both potato flake agar (PFA) and inhibitory mold agar (IMA). A slide culture (incubated at 30°C in ambient air) and a brain heart infusion slant with added broth (incubated at 35°C in CO2) of the mold were prepared for further analyses. Conversion of the mold to the yeast form occurred within two days. At 6 days, definitive identification as Sporothrix schenkii was made from demonstration of typical microscopic mold morphology upon staining the slide culture with lactophenol cotton blue and examining under light microscopy (Figure 3). The patient began a three month course of itraconazole (200 mg bid). The lesions healed over approximately an 8-10 week time frame. Two years post-surgery, there were no signs of infection. The patient later recalled an infection of the front right paw of her male cat. Upon review of the veterinary records, it was noted that the cat’s infection occurred just prior to the patient’s illness onset. Thinking it was an abscess, the patient treated the cat with ampicillin. However, the infection did not resolve and the cat was examined by a veterinarian. The veterinarian initially had a high clinical suspicion for sporotrichosis. A biopsy was submitted for pathological examination, but no culture was submitted. Results of the hematoxilin and eosin stain (H&E) examination, although negative for pathogens, showed severe chronic suppurative inflammation. The cat was treated for bacterial infection with enrofloxacin in conjunction with twice daily 2-minute betadine soaks, and the infection healed completely. After the definitive diagnosis was obtained, the patient contacted her veterinarian to request a re-examination of the cat’s biopsy specimen. Re-examination of the original H&E stain showed low numbers of organisms that resembled inflammatory debris. Subsequent examination of tissue sections with periodic acid-schiff (PAS) stain confirmed small numbers of yeast forms consistent with Sporothrix schenkii. Discussion Sporothrix schenkii, a dimorphic fungus, is the etiologic agent of sporotrichosis, commonly known as rose gardener’s disease. Schenck first described the fungus in the United States in 1896 [2]. Sporotrichosis occurs globally, although it tends to occur more frequently in tropical and subtropical regions. In the United States, sporotrichosis is considered to be endemic to the Mississippi and Missouri River valleys [3, 4], whereas cases have been reported infrequently in California and the southwestern United States [3, 5-10]. It is difficult to estimate the incidence of sporotrichosis because it is not a reportable disease either in California or nationally. Historically, sporotrichosis has been associated with gardeners and agricultural workers. Dimorphic fungi such as S. schenkii exist as a mold in the environment. Once the conidia are introduced into the body by inhalation or traumatic injury, the organisms convert to the yeast phase. Thus, dimorphic fungi are typically infectious while in the mold form. S. schenkii is present in soil, hay, sphagnum moss, and decaying vegetation. Inoculation usually occurs via penetration of the skin on the extremities while manipulating plant and soil materials. Rarely, the organisms may be inhaled, resulting in pulmonary sporotrichosis. Compared to other dimorphic fungi, Sporothrix schenkii is unusual in that zoonotic transmission occurs, particularly from felines [1]. Sporadic cases of zoonotic transmission from various animals have been reported throughout the decades, some of which indicate the possibility of transmission in the absence of wounds [1, 5, 11-18]. In 2005, Brazilian researchers initially reported on the first known epidemic of cat-associated sporotrichosis [19]. As of 2008, this on-going epidemic has affected 759 people, 64 canines, and 1503 felines. Of the people affected, 83.4 percent reported contact with cats with sporotrichosis, 55.8 percent of whom reported a cat scratch or bite [18]. The same research group conducted a study in 2001 that isolated Sporothrix schenkii from the nails of affected cats [20]. A case-control study in Peru identified cat ownership as a risk factor for lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis [21]. A subsequent Peruvian study of 84 cats showed a 2.38 percent prevalence of Sporothrix schenkii isolated from the nails of apparently healthy cats, suggesting that unaffected cats may serve as a reservoir for human infections [22]. Outdoor cats are at highest risk for contracting sporotrichosis. Like humans, cats acquire the disease via penetrating injury by foreign body or by fighting other cats [12]. We could find no instances of sporotrichosis occurring in indoor cats in the literature. However, Smilack reported a case in which both humans and felines exposed to sphagnum moss applied outdoors developed sporotrichosis [11]. Thus, there is potential risk for indoor cats to acquire the infection from sphagnum moss used for houseplants. In the United States, sporotrichosis is an uncommon feline disease. Veterinarians and cat owners are at increased risk of contracting the disease because of the high level of transmissibility from felines to humans as compared with other animal species [12, 23]. The high level of contagiousness of cats with sporotrichosis is thought to arise from the typically high numbers of organisms present in the lesions. High numbers of yeast-phase organisms in cat lesions coupled with the fact that humans often recall no injury suggests that the yeast phase of S. schenkii may be acquired through intact skin. However, microscopic tears in the skin may occur without knowledge, permitting inoculation of the yeast phase organism. Once the organism gains entry, the typical incubation period is 1 week to 2 months in humans, with most cases manifesting within the first three weeks of exposure. The clinical forms of sporotrichosis are categorized as localized (or fixed) cutaneous, lymphocutaneous, disseminated (systemic), and pulmonary. The lymphocutaneous form is the most common clinical presentation, with a primary ulcerative lesion and subcutaneous nodules extending in a linear pattern along the lymphatic channels (sporotrichoid distribution). As Kwon-Chung and Bennett note [24], the organisms forming the subcutaneous nodules rarely infect the lymph tissues themselves. Disseminated disease may arise from cutaneous inoculation or hematogenous spread from the lungs and most often occurs in immunocompromised patients [6, 25]. Because of the high burden of organisms in feline lesions, diagnosis of sporotrichosis in cats is often possible by histological examination, but the definitive diagnosis of sporotrichosis in both humans and cats requires recovery of the organism from culture [25, 26]. Demonstration of the mold form at 25°C and the yeast form at 37°C is required for definitive identification. The microscopic morphology of Sporothrix schenkii is distinctive. In the mold form the conidia are arranged in a bouquet-like fashion at the ends of the conidiophores. Serological [27-31] and molecular [32] assays are being developed by researchers as an aid to diagnosis. In conclusion, we presume the patient contracted sporotrichosis from her male cat. The patient had no exposure to environmental risk factors such as gardening or other activities that entail contact with vegetation. The only known exposure she had was from her cat, which was retrospectively diagnosed with cutaneous sporotrichosis. No known cat-associated trauma occurred at the site of infection, but close contact with both cats was frequent, suggesting that transmission of the yeast phase organism via unbroken skin may be possible. A more likely mode of transmission is microscopic tearing of the skin from the typical kneading type of activity by a cat, allowing introduction of the organism. Maintaining clipped claws in domestic cats’ and restricting access to the outdoors may help prevent the transmission of sporotrichosis. The type of intimate contact that may occur with domestic felines may lead to infection of sites other than the extremities and complicate the diagnosis. Because the definitive diagnosis is contingent upon culture of the organism, it is important to submit samples for cultures early in the disease course to avoid adverse patient outcomes such as multiple invasive procedures and the risk of disseminated disease.
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January 27, 2014

CParker313 I need a copy of the case study from calf for my doctor how can I get it from U
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June 24, 2013

I FINALLY AFTER MONTHS OF MISERY FIGURED OUT THE ANSWER TO THE SAME CRAZY PROBLEM ALL OF YOU DESCRIBED. I have spent hours trying to figure this worm under scab won't heal issue. I've had dozens on my face. It so simple it makes me want to cry that it took so long to figure out and to realize I was self creating the problem. Not ringworm FYI.... CONTACT DERMITITIS FROM AN ALERGIC REACTION TO NEOSPORIN AND POLYSPORIN. I stopped using both and only used tea tree oil for one day and all 5 of my existing sores do NOT have any of the worms under the scabs this morning. THANK GOD. (I did clean the inside of each sore really well before using tea tree) I am guessing tons of folks on this thread use these ointments trying to control infection of small sores that turn into big sores over time, it's the ointment in my case. I had to share this once I realized what my problem was. Good luck everyone!
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December 30, 2015

Just google image searched contact dermatitis and you would be 100% incorrect, the images don't even slightly coincide with the very first described post, are you even reading ? sigh, go away
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June 25, 2013

Further investigation revealed what the seeds worm root things papules, these are hair follicles that are collapsing in on themselves as a result of the ALERGIC reaction. White blood cells rush to the site to repair and come up through the hair follicle trying to repair it. It's the end of the day and all signs of my seeds are gone. Definitely a ALERGIC reaction. Google ALERGIC papule and pics will confirm that these are the same as what you are experiencing. Thank God for the Internet.
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July 04, 2013

6 months after being ill slept 3 months nausea vomiting diareah sores worms under scabs, black hairs coarse hairs that twitched when i picked them out on the counter weather it was static or part of this disease, bacteria, infection, ect. DRAMA. after all creams neosprin, antibiotics. WHAT WORKED FOR ME LAMISIL, LOTRIMIN 2 SHOWERES A DAY IF NOT 3. BLEACH BATH ONE CUP OF BLEACH TO A TUB OF WATER ONCE A WEEK. CLEANING THE BULBS SEEDS DURING THIS WITH CLEAN TWEEZERS AND ALCHOHOL A MUST. BUT THERE GONE FINALLY. SO ARE ALL THE SYMPTOMS. EVEN THE BIG BLACK COARSE HAIRS. THEY ACTED LIKE WORMS SQUIGGLED LIKE WORMS....YIPEE GONE THANKS LAMISIL AND THE HELP OF MY LOCAL PHARMACIST.
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July 21, 2013

Ive read and tried every single suggestions posted & have much to say but wont bother at this time. 7-8 months ago this problem started for me & my days of skin picking obsession was over until doctors sent me home & suggested psychiatry for obvious lesions that despite if i pick or not leave terrible scarring. I took for granted the beauty of my skin but guess this what i must learn. Anyways to those who never succumbed to drug use or self mutilation, but look down upon others who do, Congrats, good for you! You want a COOKIE or something? Not all of us are the same & if we was what is the point of life then anyways. In the past an individual posted had said he had a heartattack one day. I am certain now after nights of research that this must be a yeast FUNGI overgrowth which will effect anyone despite gender. My docs gave me antibiotics like they were candy & could not diagnose my immediate downfall of health. Seems my recreational drug use, stress, and diet effects how bad these things get. Well i tried the full blown candida diet is NO SuGAR at all, i felt like my body was dieing it was scary, anyhow almost 1 week but failed with a cup of juice. One miraculous thing occured the lesions completely disappeared but i noticed it coming from deep in my skin only after that one day with a cup of juice. I realized with my research that if this gets in the bloodstream from a cut, that could be caused from picking will lead to a heart attack later down the line. Im 25 yrs old and can say i was gorgeous, i know i still am but finding a man to love me for me seems impossible right now. I guess i had an Epiphany and now i dont care what people think, i made mistakes for years eating unhealthy bcuz of income and peers, insulting me that i was to thin. I went broke from my health care providers negligence, nearly homeless now but i must say changing my diet to less or if no sugar at all waz unbelievable in the results. Trying new foods can always suck at first but not long its like my tastebuds woke up. I never would have thought this all it took but my depression also is gone or dont know where it went, & ive never felt so good. This skin problem absolutely crushed my heart & spirit, days of crying in front of the mirror before work trying to cover it up. Now once and awhile i cry cuz of the scars i am left with. My scumbag boyfriend left me bcuz of "how i look" and now all i got is my son, 10 dollars in my pocket, hideous scarring, & lesions that only return if i fail that diet. I love food and i only did the diet cuz i was desperate but you know what that diet is no joke its clearing up ALL my health problems but it requires the hardest but right choices that need to be made such as sobriety, desires, cravings, & accepting and loving yourself the way you are. F@$# what others got to say, this is my experience & please dont feel as if your alone bcuz your not. Take Care Everyone!! i know life can suck but there are people out here that care. felicia.sccounty
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July 21, 2013

Also try some things that are helping me, unsweetened yogurt organic if you can, apply directly to the area. Boric acid which safer than i thought just dont eat or injest. Green tea helps me with the pain or swelling. Sulfur soaps like one person said all the materials & etc surgeons use preparing and cleansing cuz this does spread to others. I have 2-3 garlic cloves a day & i see it like kills the things in the lesions. I started eating veggies with lemon juice like before or in my water to give flavor. Onions added to meals but i know many hate onions but i always loved them ive always been weird. Outdoor and active lifestyle seems to be helping as well.Less makeup as possible for ladies and 2× a day showering. This is helping but that diet actually is eliminating the problem at least 3-9 dayz No sugar in NADA but reintroduce little by little. Its tough but i believe its worth it. felicia.sccounty
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August 04, 2013

I have read the majority of these posts and none of them really fit my issue 100%. I have had small lesions on my face in my beard growth for the last 8 years, generally only one at a time. They itch like crazy and are quite painful to the touch. When I have picked them they have have had clear/opaque 'spikes' that are approximately 2mm in length and have a gelatinous/rubbery quality. Underneath the initial scab with the spikes and slightly deeper is a firm rubbery ball, when I have removed the ball the lesions seem to heal over but then I get another one a centimetre or so from the last one. Thanks to wawa's comments on here regarding ringworm I tried clotrimazol (canesten) during the day when I had to go out, and at night I made my own remedy using a cheap oil free moisturiser, vinegar and dispersible aspirin. Salicylic Acid (aspirin) is used in many skin products and vinegar kills fungus. I put my remedy on when at home, in a thick layer so if i went to pick it I would get a finger full of moisturiser. It also seems to have helped break my picking habit.
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August 06, 2013

Hi Everyone, I've been dealing with this issue for a while and have been to see several doctors. I've tried antibiotics and antifungal oral and topical medications. While the fungal medication did seem to help some, the sores on my face never completely went away. I could get the sore to scab over and I was really good about leaving the scab alone. However, when the scab came off (about a week to ten days later) the skin underneath it never looked like it healed properly. It always looked like there was fluid under the skin and there was always some swelling around the sore. I have cats and I started looking into the possibility that I got some kind of skin mite from them. They sleep on my pillow and are generally always up in my face. I'm thinking that I picked the sore on my face (terrible I know) and then it got infected with mites when I laid my face on my pillow. It makes sense because I've had very strange acne for the past several years and it has recently become worse. I pretty much refused to go back to a doctor and so I did some research and I bought some anti-parasite medication and it seems to have really helped, more than anything else I've tried. I've also been using tea tree oil as well. There are lots of studies that suggest that Rosacea and skin mites are connected. Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated. I wish the best for everyone dealing with these skin issues.
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August 15, 2013

Came across this page when searching for a different issue, but have a worthwhile suggestion. From the time I was eight, I would get this hardcore dandruff build up on my scalp that was white, flaky, and could become half a centimeter thick. It didn't stop there, but went to my my eyebrows, and around my nose. I know this is not what you had, but I made an important discovery the hard way. I was told to use special shampoos that had chemicals to kill this "fungus" and eventually built up a high tolerance, and even lost my sense of smell. Finally, my mom found a shampoo that was for scalp care that used ginger root instead. It was a miracle how well it worked, and a relief for a then preteen me. A few years later, it was gone, but I started getting bad acne, so my dermatologist gave me some antibiotics, and the thing about antibiotics, is that it doesn't distinguish between good and bad skin bacteria, and with the environment open, the fungal infection came back worse than ever. The ginger stuff is the best I can find, and so gentle, and it took three years but I have it under control. My suggestion is getting the body shops ginger scalp care shampoo, and try using it as a body wash for a while or juice a fresh root and try it.
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August 20, 2013

I don't know if this post will be accepted, but I will try & see. Google acne white cores first. You will find sites with many people experiencing the exact same little zit that becomes a monster, fragile peeling skin, multiple white cores, oozes & crusts but won't scab, won't heal, must pick them out, itches like the devil, grows & spreads, etc. The works. ehealthforum, justanswer, healthboards, steadyhealth and skinpick are sites with some people experiencing these Pandora's Box Zits. Mystery zits. Please help me zits. Maybe would be helpful to post among those as well, and pull them here or there so that the sufferers can find each other easier!
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August 28, 2013

PLEASE READ ALL OF THIS AND I THINK YOU WILL BE VERY HAPPY WITH WHAT I HAVE FOUND. LUPOID SYCOSIS/ SYCOSIS BARBAE (I have listed how I resolved my infections at the bottom, IN LESS THAN A WEEK) I too have had the dreaded white roots, plugs, seeds inside the sores that won’t go away and when they do go away they pop up somewhere else. Multiple doctors’ visits. Tons of antibiotics and over a year of DEEP and FRUSTRATING confidence killing facial infections and scarring. I am 50 years old with normal skin, menopausal and also a known immunity issue. I have had pityriasis rosacea, shingles and MRSA. I knew this was more than a staph infection. But WHAT is it?????? I spent countless hours on the internet trying to find a definite answer. I thought it was contact dermatitis but that was wrong so I kept looking. I slowly put the pieces together and had a HUGE light bulb go off about a week ago. I currently have a thumb nail that is fungal infected as well as a fungal infection in the creases of my thighs. I knew this stuff on my face had to be fungal. I am a germophobe and beyond clean but my immune system causes me to catch just about everything. I kept going back to Tinea Barbae because something was telling me my answer was there. It is normally a male centered infection because of their facial hair but women can get it to. It can occur anywhere there are hair follicles. I saw the definition of Kerion Ringworm and it caused me to sit up in my bed and go WTF, this is it. We all pushed it away because it is normally a scalp infection but I found this paragraph on one of the sites I visit: Inflammatory deeper tinea barbae is caused primarily by zoophilic dermatophytes. This variety, termed a kerion, is the most common clinical presentation. Most patients show solitary plaques or nodules; however, multiple plaques are relatively common. Usually localized on the chin, cheeks, or neck, involvement of the upper lip is rare. The characteristic lesion is an inflammatory reddish nodule with pustules and draining sinuses on the surface. Hairs are loose or broken, and depilation is easy and painless. Pus-filled whitish masses involve the hair root and follicle. Over time, the surface of the indurated nodule is covered by exudate and crust. This variety of tinea barbae usually is associated with generalized symptoms, such as regional lymphadenopathy, malaise, and fever. This led me to this: Infection often begins on the chin or neck, but in severely affected patients, tinea barbae may cover the entire bearded area of the face and neck, occasionally resulting in indurated verrucous plaques or nodules. Tinea barbae may be asymptomatic; however, mild pruritus is characteristic. Spontaneous resolution of tinea barbae may occur, especially in inflammatory tinea barbae. Lupoid sycosis, a deep form of tinea barbae, is so named because it may resemble lupus vulgaris.[3] LUPOID SYCOSIS/ SYCOSIS BARBAE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Google it people and look at the definition and most importantly the images. Then I found this article Part Two: Adult “Acne” This is where the “saga” starts to get interesting. After my adolescent acne should have cleared up 35 years ago, it got slowly worse. All over the bearded part of my face, what appeared to be sacs of hardened oil under the surface of the skin had been forming nodules. These didn’t get infected, each just grew larger. Over the years I’ve seen dermatologists who said, because of my otherwise great health, “you’re just a middle aged adolescent,” blaming it on high testosterone, etc. The apparent acne problem continued and worsened. I’ve seen doctors, dermatologists, pharmacists, herbalists, laser specialists, and spiritual healers. I’ve bought every acne ointment known to man. I took pills, vitamins, and herbs. I changed diet. I get plenty of exercise. Nothing worked. I had extensive surgery to correct the problem three years ago, and within 18 months it looked just as bad as before. As a public speaker and author in my profession, the skin condition was emotionally upsetting and stressful. Having conquered toe nails, I started researching down the path that maybe the acne was caused by a fungus (although the symptoms didn’t look like my feet). Was I surprised when I found: “ Tinea barbae is a superficial dermatophyte infection that is limited to the bearded areas of the face and neck and occurs almost exclusively in older adolescent and adult males. Symptoms include inflammatory, deep, kerion-like plaques and noninflammatory superficial patches and lumps resembling bacterial folliculitis. The hair breaks off below the skin surface. It is caused by several dermatophytes. Trichophyton species are most common. Infection of bearded skin may be the result of autoinoculation from tinea pedis or onychomycosis.” In other words, the mess on my face that had caused me so much grief and been misdiagnosed for decades was caused by the same fungus that gave my feet a problem. Apparently the dermatophytes enter the hair follicle (nails and hair are similar biological structures), then attack the sebaceous gland, feeding off the body oil; then the body’s immune system reacts with scaring and hardening the facial oil, leaving an oil nodule. The dermatophytes then migrate to the next follicle, and eventually dozens of affected follicles link as a nodule the size of a pea. Now it became obvious what had happened: The athlete’s foot I got as a teenager went to my toe nails, and, because I was ignorant of the relationship of using a towel on my face that might have been used on my feet or crotch, the fungus got transferred. Not a single dermatologist who examined my face ever bothered to ask the question: “Do you have toe nail fungus or athlete’s foot!” Using the same solution on my facial outbreaks as on my toe nails (the revised formula with coconut oil), the facial condition is clearing up. Just like with my feet, skin is sloughing off and the nodules are beginning to eject. This is the best result I’ve seen in years. I expect it will take a few months for the problem to be cured, as the fungus is down below the level of the base of the hair follicle in the sebaceous gland. So now I have my answer and this is what I did- I purchased: loofah walnut puff scrub fungal liquid from the toenail section that is climotrizol. It must be the liquid with the brush, not cream Also the Lamisil cream with climotrizol Tea tree face wash (trader joes) Tea tree wash face pads (trader joes) Colloidal Silver from Wellness (proven antifungal remedy) Morning: Wash with tea tree cleanser, use the tea tree scrubs to lightly buff the surface layers and open the infections up a bit (this allows the medicine you are about to apply to get INTO the infection) Dry thoroughly with paper towel Spray Colloidal silver on the infected areas (helps heal infections externally) and use as directed orally (this helps heal from the inside out) Take the Lamisil and put a thin coat over the entire face, this will help stop the spread of the infection should the fungus “escape” from the current lesions Take the Climotrizol liquid and coat all the infected areas at least 2 times. It will BURN like hell but well worth the results. THE MOST IMPORTANT THING IN ALL OF THIS IS TO NOT NOT NOT PULL THE WHITE PLUGS OUT OF THE SORES. When you do this you unleash the wraths of hell to continue down the road of never clearing up the of lesions. These things are our bodies way of trying to protect us. When you pull them out you are accelerating the infection instead of diminishing it!!!! I freely admit I am a picker and previously would pull these things out as fast as I could but as you all know it would not go away. I forced myself to stop picking them out and THANK GOD I DID. Evening: Same process but use the walnut scrub and be a bit more vigorous in scrubbing, It will take the crust off but it was my experience that this helped allow the fungal killing liquid to readily attack the fungus. I have been doing this process for 5 days now and I am 90% better than when I started. It immediately started killing off the stuff, the weeping in the sores stopped, the white things became more prominent for a few days and then just disappeared. The hollow sunken in lesions are almost flat and I have healthy light scabs left at this point. I had 10 of these nasty’s when I started, some worse than others. Looking in the mirror there are only 3 left with any real dimpling apparent. I intend to continue doing this long term until there are no more spots coming up. I really hope some of you find this is your solution too. God knows it has been a painful road but at least he helped me find my answer. Good luck and God bless.
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October 19, 2013

Hi finally have my answer Wondering if the stuff you're using is still working.. I have the same problem
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October 19, 2013

Hi finally have me answer I have the same problem Wondering if the stuff you're using still works
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October 30, 2013

I have suffered from this since I was 16. Im 44 now and have ruined my skin. I have never thought of ringworm but lo and behold the lesions are ring shaped. I get them on face and back, butt arms and now legs. I get those white adherent cores too. I pick and pick at any rough texture and end up looking like hell. I have just coated my face back butt and arms with tolnaftate. I really hope I am onto something here as I am at the endof my rope I feel I can get a handle on the picking if my skin wasnt always bumpy and no little white cores that I just HAVE to try and remove! I even resort lately to taking my razor to shave down all the rough dry spots and scabs so makeup goes on better. Ive used every implement known to pick. I am so glad I found this site and know there are others like me...trying to hide open sores and scabs but not being able to stop. Im hoping the tolnaftate will set me on the way to healing some of the damage.
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December 14, 2013

sharing is very useful for me, thank ya over this sharingya my site http://caramembuatblog.co/ and Greetings for all
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December 26, 2013

the first problem we all have is Dermatillomania. You should check out this blog that I have emailed to me at www.skinpickingsupport.com I would so love to know what those little white things are, but there are just too many possibilities out there to actually get a definitive answer. So I guess I will just work on keeping my hands away from my face, which is fucking impossible!
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December 31, 2013

I've suffered from similar skin afflictions, but I cannot decide if you are describing a sebaceous cyst, which would require the underlying cyst sack to be removed entirely before healing can occur, or if you are describing fungal ringworm (tinea corporis or tinea barbae). The latter has mysteriously pledged me for decades. Having eradicated the spread with a weeklong application of topical terbinafine hydrochloride 1%, I feel somewhat stupid for not recognizing the underlying cause decades ago. In others describing theses symptoms, cats are often mentioned, thus I hypothesis that the specific tinea species leading to these unique manifestations may be primarily zoonotic with a primary host of feline.
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December 24, 2014

It's Demodex injai. Dogs are usually the primary host, but they made the leap to humans. I suffered for 7 years before finally figuring it out.
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December 30, 2015

fuck off asshole ... get the fuck off the thread
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January 16, 2014

I have been dealing with the same exact life consuming issue for the last 8 months. 3 different doctors and countless medications and creams for the sores that covered my once flawless skin. Without getting into too much, pimple like bumps that hurt, then open and that that won't heal, skin only closes when u remove the little clear cylinder shaped things growing in clusters within each sore. I would say if I dont take them out it feels like needles ripping through my face. When I pulled one out from the root it would bleed like crazy. Seemed like each sore was connected by a blood supply. Itchy at times but nothing compared to the pain. After all the pain, embarrassment, hours wasted in mirror picking trying to get my face to heal enough for me to leave the house. I was finally diagnosed with shingles. Antiviral for three days and what hasn't gone away in 8 months is clearing up. Today when I took the scab off it was smooth underneath. no more little spikey, cylinders to pull out and stick on the side of the mirror for later inspection. If anyone has felt the hopelessness the I have had with these sores that ruined my life talk to ur doctor, it's hsv3. The little clear things are the virus covered in a protein sheath to protect it. There can be hundred of these little things in each sore. Good luck!!
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December 24, 2014

It's not shingles (I've had that too). It's Demodicosis. Look at pictures of "demodetic mange." That's exactly what my face looked like; lesions that would not heal, the weird, extremely painful plugs. I was down to only one eyebrow. See my longer post on this thread about the condition. I suffered with it for 7 years. It RUINED my complexion.
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December 24, 2014

Search this: demodicosis humans photo

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